The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright Download (read online) free eBook (PDF ePub Kindle)

The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible's Grand Narrative

Winner, 2007 Christianity Today Missions/Global Affairs Book Most Christians would agree that the Bible provides a basis for mission. But Christopher Wright boldly maintains that mission is bigger than that–there is in fact a missional basis for the Bible! The entire Bible is generated by and is all about God’s mission. In order to understand the Bible, we need a missiona

…more


The Book in English!


Download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright free eBook pdf mobi epub mp3 fb2 CD txt doc kindle Ibook iOS:


The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright (0.00 USD)


Download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright eBook Free:

MIRROR-2

The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright.pdf (USD-0.00)
The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright.epub (USD-0.00)
The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright.doc (USD-0.00)
The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright.txt (USD-0.00)
The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright.mobi (USD-0.00)


Join hundreds of thousands of satisfied members who previously spent countless hours searching for media and content online, now enjoying the hottestnew games, music, books, movies & software on our site.
It’s here and it’s free. Here’s why you should join:


  • Unlimited books, magazines and comics, wherever you go: directly in your browser on your computer or tablet.
  • More than 10 million titles spanning every genre imaginable, at your fingertips.
  • Get the best books, magazines and comics in all genres, including action, adventure, anime, manga, children and family, classic, , Horror, Music, Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Sport and more.
  • New titles are added every day! We want to keep things new.
  • All platforms. Fully optimized
  • Find out why thousands of people go every day.Sign up and enjoy your entertainment, unlimited!


    TAGS:
    Online The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright eBook, Book The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright FB2, download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright PDF , Download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright MOBI, Online The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright eBook, free download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright IPhone, Online ebook The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright PDF, Free The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright DJVU, Free download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright TXT, Download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright RTF, Online The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright FB2 , eBook The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download TXT, Free The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download eBook, Book The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download MOBI, download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright IPad, read The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright MOBI, Read online The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright DOC, Free The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright AWZ, Download eBook The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright iPad , Free The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright DJVU, Download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright eBook free, Free download The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright DVD, Read online The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright TXT, Book The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download DJVU, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download book free, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download book pdf free, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright pdf book download free, Download eBook The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright pdf free, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download free epup, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright ePub book download free, download eBook The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download free pdf, The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative by Christopher J.H. Wright download eBooks free.

    Eric Chappell

    Jan 25, 2012

    rated it
    it was amazing

    Review: Outstanding. This book is really an eye-opening piece of work. The whole Bible, all of Scripture is mission, i.e. God’s mission to renew all things and he has brought us along on that mission as His people.

    Introduction:

    “…the whole Bible is itself a ‘missional’ phenomenon.” (22)

    “The Bible renders to us the story of God’s mission through God’s people in their engagement with God’s world for the sake of the whole of God’s creation. The Bible is the drama of this God of purpose engaged in

    Introduction:

    “…the whole Bible is itself a ‘missional’ phenomenon.” (22)

    “The Bible renders to us the story of God’s mission through God’s people in their engagement with God’s world for the sake of the whole of God’s creation. The Bible is the drama of this God of purpose engaged in the mission of achieving that purpose universally, embracing past, present and future, Israel and the nations, “life, the universe and everything,” and with its center, focus, climax, and completion in Jesus Christ. Mission is not just one of a list of things that the Bible happens to talk about, only a bit more urgently than some. Mission is, in that much-abused phrase, “what it’s all about” (22).

    Mission–“Fundamentally, our Mission means our committed participation as God’s people, at God’s invitation and command, in God’s own mission within the history of God’s world for the redemption of God’s creation” (22).

    Defines Mission in a more general sense: a long-term purpose or goal that is achieved through proximate objectives and planned actions (23).

    Missionary–Wright doesn’t like using this term because of its connotations, i.e. the activity of sending and crosscultural communication of the gospel. In that sense, the OT does not have a missionary message.

    Missional–in this sense, Israel was missional, i.e. they had an identity and role to God’s ultimate intention of blessing the nations.

    Structure:

    1. Hermeneutical Concerns: The Bible and Mission

    2. The God of Mission

    3. The People of Mission

    4. The Arena of Mission

    Part 1: The Bible and Mission

    In Luke 24, Jesus not only talks about the messianic thrust of the OT, but its missional thrust as well. “The proper way for disciples of the crucified and risen Jesus to read their Scriptures, is messianically and missionally” (30).

    “We recognize that the christological focus of the Bible operates in many different ways . . . To speak of the Bible being “all about Christ” does not (or should not) mean that we try to find Jesus of Nazareth in every verse by some feat of imagination. Rather we mean that the person and work of Jesus become the central hermeneutical key by which we, as Christians, articulate the overall significance of these texts in both Testaments . . . The same is true of the missiological focus of the Bible. To say that the Bible is “all about mission” does not mean that we try to find something relevant to evangelism in every verse. We are referring to something deeper and wider in relation to the Bible as a whole” (31).

    Chapter 1: Searching for a Missional Hermeneutic

    Wright surveys the history of hermeneutics with regard to mission. His conclusion is that the steps towards a missiological reading of the Bible is so far unsatisfactory.

    “…ever since the New Testament church… [we have] wrestled with the problems of multiple cultural contexts. And yet in the midst of them all it has sustained the conviction that there is an objective truth for all in the gospel that addresses and claims people in any context. . .Cultural plurality is nothing new for Christian mission. It is rather the very stuff of missional engagement and missiological reflection. We may be challenged by swimming in the postmodern pool, but we need not feel out of our depth there” (46).

    Chapter 2: Shaping a Missional Hermeneutic

    1. The Bible as the Product of God’s Mission

    a. A missional hermeneutic of the Bible begins with the Bible’s very existence (48). Scripture is itself the product of and witness to the ultimate mission of God.

    b. Block quote: “The very existence of the Bible is incontrovertible evidence of the God who refused to forsake his rebellious creation, who refused to give up, who was and is determined to redeem and restore fallen creation to his original design for it…The very existence of such a collection of writings testifies to a God who breaks through to human beings, who disclosed himself to them, who will not leave them unilluminated in their darkness, … who takes the initiative in re-establishing broken relationships with us” (48) [Charles Taber, Missiology 11 (1983)]

    c. The text is itself a product of mission in action. For example, most of Paul’s letters were written in the heat of missionary efforts (49). “In short, a missional hermeneutic proceeds from the assumption that the whole Bible renders to us the story of God’s mission through God’s people in their engagement with God’s world for the sake of the whole of God’s creation” (51).

    2. Biblical Authority and Mission

    a. The Great Commission implies an imperative, a mandate. So it also presupposes an authority behind that imperative (51).

    b. Often because of our view that Authority = Command (in a militaristic fashion), we do not perceive any missional authority in nonimperative texts because we conceive authority only in terms of commands (52). Interesting.

    c. Re-think Authority. Authority is the predicate of reality, the source and boundary of freedom. Wright has three realities in mind: The reality of this God. The reality of this story (the worldview of the OT that answers the questions: where are we? who are we? what’s gone wrong? what is the solution?). The reality of this people (54-56).

    d. The Great Commission (preceded by the Great Communication): “all authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me”–this is the reality behind the command, the indicative behind the imperative. The identity and the authority of Jesus of Nazareth, crucified and risen, is the cosmic indicative on which the mission imperative stands authorized” (60).

    Further Reading: Graeme Goldsworthy, “The Great Indicative: An aspect of a biblical theology of mission,” Reformed Theological Review 55 (1996).

    e. Interpret the indicative and imperative in light of each other. A missional hermeneutic will not obsess with only the great mission imperatives or be tempted to impose one assumed priority over another (e.g. evangelism or social justice or liberation or ecclesiastical order as the only “real” mission).

    3. The Biblical Theocentric Worldview and the Mission of God

    a. The appropriateness of speaking of a “missional basis of the Bible” becomes apparent only when we shift our paradigm of mission from: 1. our human agency to the ultimate purpose of God Himself, 2. mission as “missions” that we undertake, to mission as that which God has been purposing and accomplishing from eternity to eternity, 3. an anthropocentric (or ecclesiocentric) conception to a radically theocentric worldview

    b. A missional hermeneutic means that we seek to read any part of the Bible in light of [Wright precedes this with a more detailed explanation of each]:

    i. God’s purpose for his whole creation, including the redemption of humanity and the creation of the new heavens and new earth

    ii. God’s purpose for human life in general on the planet and of all the Bible teaches about human culture, relationships, ethics and behavior

    iii. God’s historical election of Israel, their identity and role in relation to the nations, and the demands he made on their worship, social ethics, and total value system

    iv. the centrality of Jesus of Nazareth, his messianic identity and mission in relation to Israel and the nations, his cross and resurrection

    v. God’s calling of the church, the community of believing Jews and Gentiles who constitute the extended people of the Abraham covenant, to be the agent of God’s blessing to the nations in the name and for the glory of the Lord Jesus Christ (67-68)

    Part 2: The God of Mission

    Texts that speak to YHWH as one, only God of all earth: Deut 10:14; 2 Kings 19:15; Jer 32:27; Is 54:5; Gen 18:25; Ps 47:7

    “If YHWH alone is the one true living God who made Himself known in Israel and who wills to be known to the ends of the earth, then our mission can contemplate no lesser goal” (71).

    Chapter 3: The Living God Makes Himself Known in Israel

    God is known through what He does and says.

    Exodus and Return from Exile are two examples par excellence of Israel coming to know their God

    Knowing God through the Experience of God’s Grace

    1. The Exodus

    A. God promises to do 3 things: Liberate from Egyptian yoke, enter into mutual covenant relationship, bring them to promised land of forefathers.

    B. Israel will only “do” one thing: Exod 6:7–know YHWH. See also Deut 4:32-39. What 3 things did they know? That YHWH is Incomparable, Sovereign, and Unique (76).

    1. Song of Moses (earliest poetic text in OT): (a) YHWH is incomparable, Who is like You? YHWH is clearly the most powerful God around, beyond comparison when it comes to conflict of wills. Later in OT similar themes emerge: keeping promises (2 Sam 7:22); in power and wisdom (Jer 10:6-7, 11-12); in heavenly assembly (Ps 89:6-8); in ruling nations (Jer 49:19; 50:44); in pardoning sin (Mic 7:18); in saving power (Isa 64:4). Missional Truth: Because there is none like Him, all nations will eventually come and worship Him as the only true God (Ps 86:8-9)–see chs 14 and 15. YHWH in class of His own.

    (b) YHWH is king, Exod 15:18–reigning. Verb form entails: He has demonstrated that he is king, he is now reigning, and he will go on reigning without interruption. First significant time Kingdom of God mentioned! Unexpected kingship in that he exercises it on behalf of weak and oppressed (79), i.e. an ethnic minority undergoing economic exploitation, political oppression, and a state-sponsored campaign of terrorizing genocide. Deut 10:14-19 paradoxically puts God’s universal reign beside his localized compassion. V. 14, 17 is doxology, v. 15, 18 is surprise, v. 16, 19 is ethical response (79).

    (c) YHWH is unique–there is “no other.” Does this imply the actual existence of other gods? Wright thinks that is an Enlightenment anachronistic reading of OT. Likes Bauckham’s way of speaking of “YHWH’s transcendent uniqueness” (81). The reason there is no other god like YHWH is because there is no other god, period.

    2. The Return from Exile

    A. YHWH sovereign over history:

    1. In control of Israel: what is shocking is that a little defeated nation, scarcely a nation at all, to claim that its own deity was in charge would seem absurdly arrogant. They must be living in delusion and pathetic denial. Isa 41:22-23; 46:9-10

    2. In control of all nations: rare in ANE to find other ancient gods claiming to get involved in history, politics, or fortunes of third parties, and when they do it is usually through agency of their own nation. YHWH can act without direct agency of Israel and against her interests (84-5). See Isa 41:2-4, 25; 44:28-45:6.

    B. YHWH exercises sovereignty through his word (85):

    C. YHWH acts for the sake of his name (87):

    1. What motivated YHWH to bring people back from exile? Because leaving them permanently in exile would threaten his reputation. The name of YHWH was at stake in what God did against his own people, just as it was involve in all he did for them. See Moses’ appeal to God after golden calf and after rebellion at Kadesh Barnea. See Ezek 36:22-23; Isa 43:25

    2. Why did it matter that he should, in the process, demonstrate his claim to deity by his sovereign control of history? Name of God should be universally known. See Cyrus in Isa 45:5-6–nobody (but a few ancient historians) know Cyrus, but millions know YHWH.

    D. YHWH’s sovereignty extends over all creation: see Ps 33

    E. YHWH’s entrusts his uniqueness and universality to the witness of his people (90): it will be through Israel’s witness that YHWH’s powers of revelation and salvation and identity as sole God will be posted in public arena of world history. See Isa 43:9-12

    1. Primary responsibility of witness is to KNOW. Therefore, Knowing God!

    Knowing God through Exposure to His Judgment

    1. Egypt: main plot is deliverance of Israel from oppression of Pharaoh. But subplot is massive power encounter between YHWH and Pharaoh and all his gods. Signaled by Exod 5:2–implication is link between knowing God and obeying Him. Pharaoh will not obey because he doesnt know. Recurring motif, “Then you will know…” in Exod 7-14.

    A. What did Pharaoh come to know? See chart on p. 94

    2. Israel in Exile (95): Good bit on Jeremiah 29 and the Abrahamic promise and divine irony of being sent to Babylon, the place where Abraham was called out from (99).

    3. The nations under judgment (100): Ezekiel 38-39, Gog and Magog. Another example of God acting to extend knowledge of God. They will come to know: the holiness, greatness, and glory of God. Missional Truth (great application, 103).

    Chapter 4: The Living God makes Himself known in Jesus Christ

    Why doesn’t NT just come out and say, ‘Jesus is God?’ Because ‘theos’ in Greek was too vague and ambiguous to give such a sentence any kind of clarity or specificity. Greeks and Romans, like contemporary Hindus, would balk at such sentence if ‘god’ is left undefined and anarthrous (105).

    1. Jesus Shares the Identity of YHWH (106):

    A. Prayer and Confession–two clear indications of any person’s or community’s understanding of content and object of faith.

    1. Maranatha (O Lord, come)–Paul says in Aramaic and leaves untranslated, must have assumed his readers were familiar.

    a. “The Maranatha invocation of 1 Corinthians 16:22, therefore, represents an old Palestinian formula of prayer, directed to the Lord Jesus. It is a plea for him to come in power and glory. Had these first believers only considered Jesus maran, as their rabbi, prayer would not have been directed to him” (107).

    2. Kyrious Iesous (Jesus is Lord)

    a. ho kyrios used to translate tetragrammaton, YHWH, in LXX. Used as the Greek rendering for the name of the God of Israel more than 1600x in LXX.

    b. Good section on Philippians 2–By inserting name of Jesus where name of YHWH occurred in Isa 45, Christians: (i) gave to Jesus a God title, (ii) applied to Jesus a God text, (iii) anticipated for Jesus God worship

    c. Missional implication? If the mission of the biblical God includes his will to make himself known in his true identity as YHWH, the living God of Israel’s faith, then by identifying Jesus with YHWH, the NT sees Jesus as central to that self-revelatory dimension of God’s mission” (109).

    2. Jesus Performs the Functions of YHWH: YHWH in OT described as Creator, Ruler, Judge, and Savior–Jesus in NT described in same way

    A. Creator

    1. “Paul had the knack of bringing the most massive theological affirmations to bear upon the most mundane practical issues” (110). E.g. 1 Corinthians 8-10: 2 issues–(i) the status of idols (are they in any sense real?) and the state of the meat (is it somehow contaminated by having been sacrificed to an idol?). Paul tackles first in 1 Cor 8:4-6 and the second in 1 Cor 10:25-26.

    2. Paul applies Shema to Jesus and then uses Psalm 24 to say that everything belongs to the Lord. Thus, the whole earth belongs to Jesus as Lord. Missional implication? “For if the whole earth belongs to Jesus, there is no corner of the earth to which we can go in mission that does not already belong to him. There is not an inch of the planet that belongs to any other god, whatever the appearances. A Christ-centered theology of divine ownership of the whole world is a major foundation for missional theology, practice and ultimate confidence” (112).

    3. Good bit on the use of Psalm 110 in early church–NT joins lordship of Christ with sovereign gov’t of the living God of the faith of Israel. That’s what Jesus is doing in the premise of the Great Commission.

    B. Judge

    1. “Day of the Lord”

    C. Savior

    1. Saving is dominant activity of YHWH in OT.

    2. Name: Jesus

    3. “Salvation, in its fullest biblical sense, involves more than the forgiveness of sin–though that lies at the deepest core of it since sin is the deepest root of all the other dimensions of need and danger from which God alone can save us” (119).

    3. Jesus Fulfills the Mission of YHWH (121)

    A. God wills to be known through Jesus (see ch 3 on God’s will to be known) (122)

    B. The gospel carries the knowledge of God among the nations (123)

    4. Biblical Monotheism and Mission: Why is biblical monotheism missional?

    A. Biblical mission is driven by God’s will to be known as God (126)

    1. The exodus establishes a paradigmatic link between God’s particular identity as the God of Israel and God’s purpose of universal self-revelation to the nations (see Richard Bauckham, Bible and Mission). Later great acts of YHWH have same intention: crossing of Jordon, David’s defeat of Goliath, God’s covenant with David, God’s answering prayer in Solomon’s temple (1 kings 8:41-43, 60), God delivering Jerusalem from Assyrians (2 kings 19:19; Isa 37:20), God bringing back Israel from exile (Isa 45:6; Jer 33:9; Ezek 36:23). The whole history of Israel is intended to be the shop window for the knowledge of God in all the earth (127).

    2. Mission is not the imposition of yet another religious bondage upon an already overburdened humanity. It is the sharing of the liberating knowledge of the one true living God.

    3. The good of creation comes from humanity knowing the biblical God. Biblical mission necessarily requires biblical monotheism.

    4. God’s will to be known is the mainspring of our mission to make him known (129). God’s will to be known precedes and undergirds all of the efforts of God’s people in their mission of making him known. Thus, we are seeking to accomplish what God himself wills to happen. This is both humbling and reassuring. Humbling because our efforts would be in vain otherwise. Reassuring, because behind all our fumbles stands the supreme will of God.

    B. Biblical monotheism involves constant christological struggle.

    1. Christ-centered monotheism is just as difficult for NT church as YHWH-centered monotheism was tough for Israel. It is a constant battlefield. This is a reason why biblical monotheism is missional: it is a truth to which we are constantly called to bear witness.

    C. Biblical monotheism generates praise

    1. Book of Psalms title is tehillim (Hebrew), “praises” (132). Surprising since the largest single category of psalms are psalms of lament. Praise in OT was not about being happy and thankful, but about acknowledging the reality of the one living God in the whole of life, including tough times.

    2. John Piper, Let the Nations be Glad–“missions is not the ultimate goal of the church. Worship is. Missions exist because worship doesn’t.” But we might also say that mission exists because praise does. The praise of the church is what energizes and characterizes it for mission, and also serves as the constant reminder we so much need, that all our mission flows as obedient response to and participation in the prior mission of God.

    3. Psalm 96 structure (134)

    a. This is a new song that remixes the old words, for it celebrates the old story of what God has done for his people (v. 1-3)

    b. it is a new song that radically displaces the old gods whose former worshipers must now bring all their worship into the courts of the Lord (v. 4-9)

    c. it is a new song that transforms the old world into the anticipated righteousness and rejoicing of the reign of the Lord (v. 10-13).

    Chapter 5: The Living God Confronts Idolatry

    1. Paradoxes of the Gods

    A. Something or nothing? Interesting question about whether or not Israel believed the existence of other gods.

    1. “The essence of Israelite monotheism lies in what it affirms dynamically about YHWH, not primarily in what it denies about other gods” (138).

    2. Are other gods something or nothing? Paradoxically, they are both. They are nothing in relation to YHWH, they are something in relation to their worshipers (139).

    B. Idolatry

    1. Idols and gods as objects within creation

    2. Idols and gods as demons

    3. Idols are gods as the work of human hands

    a. Uniquene
    …more